Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 852317, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/852317
Research Article

The Effect of Economic, Physical, and Psychological Abuse on Mental Health: A Population-Based Study of Women in the Philippines

1Centre for Public Health Research, School of Health Sciences, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB, UK
2Division of Global Health & Inequalities, The Angels Trust-Nigeria, Abuja, Nigeria

Received 10 May 2014; Revised 4 November 2014; Accepted 4 November 2014; Published 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Jens Søndergaard

Copyright © 2014 Diddy Antai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The comparative effect of economic abuse and other forms of abuse in predicting depression and other mental health disorders has not been previously investigated despite its relevance for mental illness prevention. Objective. To determine the differential association of economic abuse on psychological distress and suicide attempts. Study Design. We used cross-sectional data from women aged 15–49 years in the 2008 Philippines Demographic and Health Surveys (PDHS) (N = 9,316). Results. Adjusting for sociodemographic confounders revealed positive associations between economic, physical, or psychological abuse and suicide attempts and psychological distress. Psychological and economic abuse were the strongest predictors of suicide attempts and psychological distress, respectively. Economic abuse was also negatively associated with psychological distress. Comorbidity with one mental health disorder greatly increased the odds of reporting the other mental health disorder. Conclusion. Overall, the results elucidate the differential effects of these forms of abuse on women’s mental health.