Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 970345, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/970345
Research Article

Changes in Identity after Aphasic Stroke: Implications for Primary Care

1Department of Emergency Medicine, Los Angeles County-USC, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
2Department of Family Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
4Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
5Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, ENRM Veterans Affairs Hospital, Bedford, MA 01730, USA

Received 22 July 2014; Accepted 15 November 2014

Academic Editor: Jens Søndergaard

Copyright © 2015 Benjamin Musser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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