Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3635907, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3635907
Research Article

Differences between Groups of Family Physicians with Different Attitudes towards At-Risk Drinkers: A Post Hoc Study of the ODHIN Survey in Portugal

1Preventive Medicine Institute, Faculty of Medicine of Lisbon, Edifício Egas Moniz, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisbon, Portugal
2Tomaz Ribeiro’s Primary Health Care Center, Avenida 25 de Abril, 3460-541 Tondela, Portugal
3Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Warsaw, Nowowiejska 27, 00-665 Warsaw, Poland
4Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA

Received 27 September 2015; Accepted 21 December 2015

Academic Editor: Hakan Yaman

Copyright © 2016 Frederico Rosário et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. We have recently shown that family physicians can be classified into two groups based on their attitudes towards at-risk drinkers: one with better and the other with worse attitudes. Objective. To compare the two groups regarding demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Methods. A random sample of 234 Portuguese family physicians who answered the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Interventions survey was included. The questionnaire asked questions on demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Results. Family physicians with better attitudes were younger () and less experienced () and with higher male proportion (). This group had more hours of postgraduate training (), felt more prepared to counsel risky drinkers (), and considered themselves to have better counselling efficacy (). More family physicians in the group with worse attitudes considered that doctors cannot identify risky drinkers without symptoms () and believed counselling is difficult (). Conclusions. Family physicians with better attitudes had more education on alcohol and fewer barriers to work with at-risk drinkers. These differences should be taken into account when designing implementation programs seeking to increase alcohol screening and brief advice.