International Journal of Forestry Research
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Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision107 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore1.600
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International Journal of Forestry Research has recently been accepted into GEOBASE.

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International Journal of Forestry Research publishes research about the management and conservation of trees or forests, including tree biodiversity, sustainability, habitat protection and the social and economic aspects of forestry.

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International Journal of Forestry Research maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Social and Institutional Status of Area Exclosure in North Wollo and Waghemira Zones, Northeastern Ethiopia

Forest restoration with area exclosure has the hopeful restoration strategy for nature conservation and social development goals as a countermeasure against deforestation and forest degradation. However, the status of these restoration interventions is not well known with scientific evaluation. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the social and institutional status of forest restoration with area exclosures. To do this, three districts in three agroecologies were selected purposively based on exclosure availability, and in each district, three exclosures were selected. The questionnaire survey was administered to households near the selected exclosures for both user and nonuser groups selected with simple random sampling. Required data were collected and analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics and then compared against the best practices of Ostrom’s design principles (ODPs). The result revealed that the local community has good trust and participation in highland (63%) and mid-altitude (70%) areas, but low trust and participation in lowland areas (85%). In the highland and mid-altitude areas, local communities have the right to use exclosure for multiple uses. In lowland areas, the use right is very restricted for local communities. Exclosure institutions and governance showed medium compliance in the highland, very good compliance in mid-altitude, and very poor compliance in the lowland with the ODP. This was triangulated when 79% of the respondents in highland and 82% in mid-altitude argued that area exclosure is successful and 82% of respondents argued that area exclosure is failed in the lowland. For successful and sustainable forest restoration practice with area exclosure, the approach should start at the bottom and the activity should require the full participation of the local community in all stages.

Research Article

Effects of Environmental Factors on Carbon Stocks of Dry Evergreen Afromontane Forests of the Choke Mountain Ecosystem, Northwestern Ethiopia

The purpose of this research was to quantify and compare carbon stocks in two selected dry evergreen montane forests of the Choke Mountain ecosystem that are under different management regimes. The study also attempted to assess the carbon stock along environmental gradients. The average carbon stock throughout the whole plots investigated in Anshirava forest (protected) was 180.18 t·ha−1 (53%) in AGB, 111.43 t·ha−1 (33%) in soil, 36.43 t·ha−1 (11%) in BGB, 6.09 t·ha−1 (2%) in USB, 2.69 t·ha−1 (1%) in litter, and 1.36 t·ha−1 (less than 1%) in DW. In Ziba forest (high human intervention), the average carbon stock was 106.71 t·ha−1 (44%) in AGB, 100.07 t·ha−1 (42%) in soil, 21.34 t·ha−1 (9%) in BGB, 5.41 t·ha−1 (2%) in USB, 4.82 t·ha−1 (2%) in litter, and 2.00 t·ha−1 (1%) in DW. The AGB had the greatest carbon share in both forests, followed by soil. In Anshirava and Ziba forests, the mean total carbon stocks (TCS) were 338.18 t·ha−1 and 240.36 t·ha−1, with CO2 equivalents of 1241.14 t·ha−1 and 882.12 t·ha−1, respectively. The study indicated a significant variation between the two forests. Anshirava forest has larger total carbon stocks than Ziba forest. For lower, medium, and higher altitudes, the total carbon stock variation along an altitudinal gradient was 289.67 t·ha−1, 347.93 t·ha−1, and 414.89 t·ha−1 in Anshirava forest and 270.99 t·ha−1, 204.24 t·ha−1, and 224.82 t·ha−1 in Ziba forest, respectively. As a result, a greater amount of carbon was stored at higher altitudes in Anshirava and at lower altitudes in Ziba, with no significant difference in both forests. The total carbon stock variation along slope gradient was 392.60 t·ha−1, 344.59 t·ha−1, and 295.49 t·ha−1 in Anshirava forest and 258.74 t·ha−1, 222.46 t·ha−1, and 171.46 t·ha−1 in Ziba forest for flat, intermediate, and steep slopes, respectively. This resulted in higher carbon being stored in flat slopes in both forests. Also, only at the Ziba site, a significant difference was found along the slope gradient. In each forest, eight distinct aspect facings were observed, with the western (W) aspect containing the highest value of total carbon stock in both forests. Lower values, on the other hand, were recorded in the south (S) and flat (F) aspects of Anshirava and Ziba forests, respectively. The slope aspects of both forests varied significantly. As a result, the research reveals that environmental factors have a significant impact on carbon stock value of Choke Mountain forest ecosystem, but the impact is not consistent among carbon pools.

Research Article

Development of Vegetative Propagation Strategies for Balanites aegyptiaca in the Sahel, Niger

Forests have always been a source of wood, food, and medicine for the rural populations of the Sahel. Anthropogenic and animal pressures often lead to low tree recruitment rates and seedling survival. Under certain conditions, multipurpose species such as Balanites aegyptiaca have shown dramatic decreases in population numbers. The objective of the present study is to determine the natural colonisation behaviour of B. aegyptiaca and to develop vegetative propagation strategies. Surveys were carried out in the agroforest parklands of the Regional Centre for Agricultural Research of Maradi Research Station. An inventory was carried out in 1,500 m2 plots to determine the species’ regeneration methods. We then tested seed germination success, and suckering induction, air-layering, and stem cuttings were carried out to determine the techniques best suited for the propagation of B. aegyptiaca. It emerged from this study that in nature, B. aegyptiaca is propagated naturally by dispersion of seeds (81.2%), as well as by rejection of the strain (13.5%) and by suckering (5.2%). The germination test showed that heavy seeds (38.4%) germinated best because they have a higher nutrient reserve. With a success rate of 11.1%, distal suckers react better than proximal suckers (5.5%) because they quickly acquire relative independence from the mother plant. As for air-layering, stems with large diameters react better (53.3%) than those with small diameters (46.6%) because they have thicker bark and store a large amount of elaborate sap responsible for rhizogenesis. In the stem segment cutting test, cuttings of small diameter react better at 30.8% than those of large diameter (12.6%) because they have a higher number of meristematic tissues. The stem segment cuttings seem to be the best adaptable alternative to the natural propagation of B. aegyptiaca because it combines ease of use, low cost, and a significant success rate.

Research Article

Population Structure, Regeneration Status, and Threats to Dobera glabra (Forssk.) Poir. in Chifra District, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia

Dobera glabra is a much branched multipurpose evergreen shrub or tree, which is distributed in Acacia savanna, Acacia open woodland with grassy clearings, and Acacia nubica scrub. This study investigates the population structure, regeneration status, cultural importance, and major threats to D. glabra and provides input for policy and decision-makers to develop conservation strategies that improve the population of the species. A sample plot of 30 20 meters and 10 10 meters were systematically laid along transect lines for the mature D. glabra population and seedling and saplings of the species, respectively. The historical distribution and principal threats to D. glabra were collected through semistructured interviews and focused group discussion with the purposively selected informants. Moreover, direct field observation of threats such as cutting and debarking was recorded. The density of D. glabra was found to be 18.33 stem ha−1. The mean DBH was 43.55 cm (SE 1.58), showing a bell-shaped pattern implying the mid-DBH class is the dominant class. The mean height and crown diameter was 5.5 m (SE 0.19) and 8.60 m (SE 0.31), respectively. Furthermore, the regeneration status of the D. glabra was found to be extremely poor. The major threats to the species were identified as drought, lightning, grazing, cutting, and windfall. The population structure of the species revealed a bell-shaped pattern. The extremely poor natural regeneration status of the species shows the need to implement a reactive conservation approach.

Research Article

Morphological and Anatomical Characterization of Ecotype Needles of Cedrus atlantica in Morocco

Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica (Endl.) G. Manetti ex Carrière) is an endemic species in the mountains of North Africa that is attracting international interest in its use in the reforestation of degraded ecosystems. This study aims to investigate and evaluate the morphoanatomical characteristics of needles of four cedar populations localized in the Middle and High Atlas Mountains. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA), descriptive power, scatter-plot of the discrimination function, scatter-plot of discrimination, and dendrogram of the closest Euclidean distances were made on traits. The results of the linear model of ANOVA nested as population and tree within population suggest the differences statistically significant for the traits measured at a different level. Among these traits, the length of the needle, the width of a vascular bundle including endodermis, and thickness of the wall of hypodermis cell revealed the highest discriminating characters among populations of C. atlantica from the Middle and High Atlas and between the populations of the Middle Atlas. The agglomeration of populations over short Euclidean distances also showed a higher level of differentiation between two ecotypes of C. atlantica not very geographically distant in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. The ecotype belonging to Aït Oufella and Aït Ayach confers this species a place of choice in the projects of revalorization of the Mediterranean populations, especially in semiarid areas.

Research Article

Cinnamic Acid in Frankincense Sap as a Criterion for Determining the Best Mother Plant for Vegetative Propagation of Styrax benzoin (Sumatra Benzoin) in Sumatra, Indonesia

Cinnamic acid, contained in frankincense sap produced by Styrax benzoin (Sumatra benzoin tree), is an important compound that is used for various purposes, such as preservatives, fragrances, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. The production of frankincense sap as a forest product can be increased through the inclusion of S. benzoin seeds, which are propagated from the best mother plants. This study aims to use the content of cinnamic acid contained in the sap of S. benzoin as a criterion for determining the best mother plant for propagation of seeds. The research was conducted using healthy plants, taking sap samples, identifying and confirmation of cinnamic acid levels, and determining the best mother tree based on the content of cinnamic acid. The results of this study have identified six individual S. benzoin trees of very good quality based on their phenotypic advantages and the quantity of sap production. Isolation and identification of cinnamic acid from frankincense samples showed that the composition of cinnamic acid was high (12 to 21%). Three good quality S. benzoin trees, with high cinnamic acid composition, were SBN-7 (21%), SBN-3 (18%), and SBN-10 (17%). The SBN-7 tree was then chosen as the best S. benzoin, producing 2.70 kg year−1 sap, containing cc. 21% cinnamic acid. A selected mother plant will be used as a source of plant material for vegetative propagation to produce good quality seeds similar to the properties of the parent plant forforest conservation and to increase the production of nontimber forest raw materials for medicine and other purposes. The finding of this study is the first to use the composition of cinnamic acid as a criterion for determining the best mother plant. The composition of cinnamic acid in the sap is an important parameter in determining the superiority of S. benzoin plants.

International Journal of Forestry Research
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision107 days
Acceptance to publication17 days
CiteScore1.600
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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