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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 581412, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/581412
Research Article

Influence of Gap Size and Position within Gaps on Light Levels

Département des Sciences Biologiques, Centre D'étude de la Forêt, Université du Québec à Montréal, Succursale Centre-Ville, Case Postale 8888, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3P8

Received 25 May 2009; Accepted 28 July 2009

Academic Editor: Andrew Gray

Copyright © 2009 Benoit Gendreau-Berthiaume and Daniel Kneeshaw. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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