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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 148106, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/148106
Research Article

Forest Succession and Maternity Day Roost Selection by Myotis septentrionalis in a Mesophytic Hardwood Forest

1Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
2US Geological Survey, Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
3Environmental Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180, USA
4Pennsylvania Game Commission, 2001 Elmerton Avenue, Harrisburg, PA 17110, USA

Received 17 May 2012; Revised 24 July 2012; Accepted 26 July 2012

Academic Editor: Brian C. McCarthy

Copyright © 2012 Alexander Silvis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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