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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 150157, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/150157
Research Article

Yield Responses of Black Spruce to Forest Vegetation Management Treatments: Initial Responses and Rotational Projections

Canadian Wood Fibre Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada P6A 2E5

Received 9 June 2011; Revised 17 August 2011; Accepted 4 October 2011

Academic Editor: John Sessions

Copyright © 2012 Peter F. Newton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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