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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 257280, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/257280
Review Article

Theorizing the Implications of Gender Order for Sustainable Forest Management

1Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1
2School of Environment and Sustainability and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5A6

Received 1 August 2011; Accepted 2 October 2011

Academic Editor: I. B. Vertinsky

Copyright © 2012 Jeji Varghese and Maureen G. Reed. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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