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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 703970, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/703970
Research Article

Effect of Removal of Woody Biomass after Clearcutting and Intercropping Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) with Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) on Rodent Diversity and Populations

1Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27412, USA
2Timberlands Technology South, Weyerhaeuser NR Company, 1785 Weyerhaeuser Road, Vanceboro, NC 28586, USA
3Timberlands Technology South, Weyerhaeuser NR Company, P.O. Box 2288, Columbus, MS 39704, USA

Received 6 October 2011; Accepted 16 January 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas V. Gallagher

Copyright © 2012 Matthew M. Marshall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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