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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 892327, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/892327
Research Article

Modeling the Influence of Forest Structure on Microsite Habitat Use by Snowshoe Hares

1Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine, 210 Nutting Hall, Orono, ME 04469, USA
2U.S. Geological Survey, New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Natural Resources, 211 Fernow Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Received 20 May 2013; Revised 19 August 2013; Accepted 26 August 2013

Academic Editor: Ursula Nopp-Mayr

Copyright © 2013 Angela K. Fuller and Daniel J. Harrison. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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