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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 140926, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/140926
Research Article

Ecological Features of Cultivated Stands of Aquilaria malaccensis Lam. (Thymelaeaceae), a Vulnerable Tropical Tree Species in Assamese Homegardens

1Centre for Environmental Sciences, Central University of Jharkhand, Brambe, Ranchi, Jharkhand 835205, India
2Department of Botany, Dr. Hari Singh Gour Central University, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh 470003, India

Received 10 February 2014; Accepted 22 June 2014; Published 8 July 2014

Academic Editor: Sunil Nautiyal

Copyright © 2014 P. Saikia and M. L. Khan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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