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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 179415, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/179415
Research Article

Developing a Topographic Model to Predict the Northern Hardwood Forest Type within Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus) Recovery Areas of the Southern Appalachians

1Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77840, USA
2Geospatial and Environmental Analysis Program, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
3Department of Geography, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA
4Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, U.S. Geological Survey, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
5Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA

Received 12 May 2014; Revised 14 July 2014; Accepted 18 July 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Piermaria Corona

Copyright © 2014 Andrew Evans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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