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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 821891, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/821891
Research Article

Effects of Drought Frequency on Growth Performance and Transpiration of Young Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)

1International Graduate School, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 6, 03046 Cottbus, Germany
2Chair of Soil Protection and Recultivation, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 6, 03046 Cottbus, Germany
3Centre for Energy Technology Brandenburg e.V. (CEBra), Friedlieb-Runge-Straße 3, 03046 Cottbus, Germany

Received 19 November 2013; Revised 28 January 2014; Accepted 28 January 2014; Published 17 March 2014

Academic Editor: Kihachiro Kikuzawa

Copyright © 2014 Dario Mantovani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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