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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1864039, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1864039
Research Article

Bark Thickness Equations for Mixed-Conifer Forest Type in Klamath and Sierra Nevada Mountains of California

Department of Forestry and Wildland Resources, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St. Arcata, CA 95521, USA

Received 10 July 2016; Revised 4 October 2016; Accepted 1 November 2016

Academic Editor: Mark Finney

Copyright © 2016 Nickolas E. Zeibig-Kichas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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