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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 5812043, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5812043
Research Article

Biomass and Soil Carbon Stocks in Wet Montane Forest, Monteverde Region, Costa Rica: Assessments and Challenges for Quantifying Accumulation Rates

1Environmental Science Systems, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY 13214, USA
2Monteverde Institute, Monteverde, Puntarenas, Costa Rica
3Phinizy Center for Water Sciences, Augusta, GA 30906, USA

Received 22 November 2015; Revised 31 January 2016; Accepted 10 February 2016

Academic Editor: Piermaria Corona

Copyright © 2016 Lawrence H. Tanner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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