Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3981647, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3981647
Research Article

Site Specific Stem Volume Models for Pinus patula and Pinus oocarpa

1Department of Forestry, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Mzuzu University, Private Bag 201, Luwinga, Mzuzu 2, Malawi
2Department of Forestry, Malawi College of Forestry and Wildlife, Private Bag 6, Dedza, Malawi

Correspondence should be addressed to Edward Missanjo; moc.liamg@2me.drawde

Received 1 July 2017; Revised 12 September 2017; Accepted 1 October 2017; Published 25 October 2017

Academic Editor: Qing-Lai Dang

Copyright © 2017 Herbert Malata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. Tiarks, E. K. S. Nambiar, and C. Cossalter, “Site management and productivity in tropical forest plantations,” in Occasional Paper No. 16, CIFOR, Bogor, Indonesia, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  2. R. Juma, T. Pukkala, S. de-Miguel, and M. Muchiri, “Evaluation of different approaches to individual tree growth and survival modelling using data collected at irregular intervals – a case study for Pinus patula in Kenya,” Forest Ecosystems, vol. 1, article 14, no. 1, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. D. Zianis, P. Muukkonen, R. Màkipàà, and M. Mencuccini, Biomass and Stem Volume equations for tree Species in Europe, Silva Fennica Monographs 4, The Finnish Society of Forest Science and the Finnish Forest Research institute, Vantaa, Finland, 2005.
  4. S. Labrecque, R. A. Fournier, J. E. Luther, and D. Piercey, “A comparison of four methods to map biomass from Landsat-TM and inventory data in western Newfoundland,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 226, no. 1-3, pp. 129–144, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. R. M. Lucas, N. Cronin, A. Lee, M. Moghaddam, C. Witte, and P. Tickle, “Empirical relationships between AIRSAR backscatter and LiDAR-derived forest biomass, Queensland, Australia,” Remote Sensing of Environment, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 407–425, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. P. Skovsgaard and J. K. Vanclay, “Forest site productivity: A review of spatial and temporal variability in natural site conditions,” Forestry, vol. 86, no. 3, pp. 305–315, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. W. A. Mugasha, E. E. Mwakalukwa, E. Luoga et al., “Allometric Models for Estimating Tree Volume and Aboveground Biomass in Lowland Forests of Tanzania,” Journal of Forestry Research, vol. 2016, Article ID 8076271, 13 pages, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. M. S. Watt, D. J. Palmer, H. Dungey, and M. O. Kimberley, “Predicting the spatial distribution of Cupressus lusitanica productivity in New Zealand,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, no. 3, pp. 217–223, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. N. Djomo, A. Ibrahima, J. Saborowski, and G. Gravenhorst, “Allometric equations for biomass estimations in Cameroon and pan moist tropical equations including biomass data from Africa,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 260, no. 10, pp. 1873–1885, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. L. Nunes, S. T. Gower, S. D. Peckham, M. Magalhães, D. Lopes, and F. C. Rego, “Estimation of productivity in pine and oak forests in northern Portugal using Biome-BGC,” Forestry, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 200–212, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. N. Djomo, N. Picard, A. Fayolle et al., “Tree allometry for estimation of carbon stocks in African tropical forests,” Forestry, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 446–455, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. C. M. Litton and J. B. Kauffman, “Allometric models for predicting aboveground biomass in two widespread woody plants in Hawaii,” Biotropica, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 313–320, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. E. Missanjo and G. Mwale, “A mixed-effects height-diameter model for pinus kesiyain Malawi,” Journal of Biodiversity Management and Forestry, vol. 3, no. 2, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. P. D. Hardcastle, A Preliminary Silvicultural Classification of Malawi, Forest Research institute of Malawi, Zomba, Malaw, 1978.
  15. E. T. Avery and E. H. Burkhart, Forest Measurements. McGraw-Hill companies, USA, 2002.
  16. B. Bredenkamp, “Plantation inventory,” in South African Forestry Handbook, D. L Owen, Ed., vol. 1, pp. 161–166, Southern African Institute of Forestry, Southern African, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  17. B. Husch, T. W. Beers, and J. W. Kershaw, Forest Mensuration, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, NJ, USA, 4th edition, 2003.
  18. T. M. Magalhães, “Site-specific height-diameter and stem volume equations for Lebombo-ironwood,” Annals of Forest Research, vol. 60, no. 2, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. F. X. Schumacher and F. D. S. Hall, “Logarithmic expression of timber-tree volume,” Journal of Agricultural Research, vol. 47, pp. 719–734, 1933. View at Google Scholar
  20. M. Guangyi, S. Yujun, X. Hao, and S. De-Miguel, “A mixed-effects model with different strategies for modeling volume in cunninghamia lanceolata plantations,” PLoS ONE, vol. 10, article e0140095, no. 10, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. SAS Institute, SAS/STAT Users's Guide, Cary, NC, USA, 9 edition, 2010.
  22. W. S. Zeng, W. S. Zeng, and S. Z. Tang, “Bias correction in logarithmic regression and comparison with weighted regression for nonlinear models,” Nature Precedings, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. D. Zianis, P. Muukkonen, R. Mäkipää, and M. Mencuccini, Biomass and Stem Volume Equations for Tree Species in Europe, Monographs 4, Silva Fennica, 2005. View at Scopus
  24. E. D. S. Vismara, L. Mehtätalo, and J. L. F. Batista, “Linear mixed-effects models and calibration applied to volume models in two rotations of Eucalyptus grandis plantations,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 132–141, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. W. S. Zeng, L. J. Zhang, X. Y. Chen, Z. C. Cheng, K. X. Ma, and Z. H. Li, “Construction of compatible and additive individual-tree biomass models for Pinus tabulaeformis in China,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 467–475, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C. L. Ingram and N. W. S. Chipompha, The Silvicultural Guide Book of Malawi, FRIM, Zomba, Malawi, 2nd edition, 1987.
  27. J. Chave, M. Réjou-Méchain, A. Búrquez et al., “Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees,” GCB Bioenergy, vol. 20, no. 10, pp. 3177–3190, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. A. Mandal, B. K. V. Yadav, K. K. Yadav, I. C. Dutta, and S. M. Haque, “Development of allometric equation for biomass estimation of eucalyptus camaldulensis: A study from Sagarnath Forest,” International Journal of Biodiversity and Ecosystems, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 001–007, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  29. S. D. Makungwa, A. Chittock, D. L. Skole, G. Y. Kanyama-Phiri, and I. H. Woodhouse, “Allometry for biomass estimation in Jatropha trees planted as boundary hedge in farmers' fields,” Forests, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 218–233, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. M. Sharma and J. Parton, “Height-diameter equations for boreal tree species in Ontario using a mixed-effects modeling approach,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 249, no. 3, pp. 187–198, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. R. Calama and G. Montero, “Interregional nonlinear height-diameter model with random coefficients for stone pine in Spain,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 150–163, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. B. Vargas-Larreta, F. Castedo-Dorado, J. G. Álvarez-González, M. Barrio-Anta, and F. Cruz-Cobos, “A generalized height-diameter model with random coefficients for uneven-aged stands in El Salto, Durango (Mexico),” Forestry, vol. 82, no. 4, pp. 445–462, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. Y. J. Lee, D. W. Coble, J. K. Pyo, S. H. Kim, and W. K. Lee, “A mixed-effects height-diameter model for Pinus densiflora trees in Gangwon Province, Korea,” Journal of Korean Forest Society, vol. 98, pp. 178–182, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  34. T. Hawkins, “Eucalyptus Camaldulensis, Dalbergia Sissoo, Acacia Auriculiformis and Cassia Siamea in the Central Bhabar-Teral of Nepal,” Oxford Forestry Institute Occasional, vol. 33, 1987. View at Google Scholar
  35. E. Missanjo, G. Kamanga-Thole, and D. Bonongwe, “Allometric Equations for Estimation of Above Ground Biomass of Eucalyptus Camaldulensisin Malawi,” Journal of Basic and Applied Research International, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 41–47, 2015. View at Google Scholar