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International Journal of Food Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 276950, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/276950
Research Article

Antiglycation Activity of Iridoids and Their Food Sources

1Research and Development, Morinda, Inc., 737 East 1180 South, American Fork, UT 84003, USA
2Research and Development, Morinda, Inc., 3-2-2 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023, Japan
3Department of Language and Literature, Kyoritsu Women’s Junior College, 2-2-1 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8437, Japan

Received 29 August 2014; Revised 21 November 2014; Accepted 24 November 2014; Published 29 December 2014

Academic Editor: Kuniyasu Soda

Copyright © 2014 Brett J. West et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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