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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2009, Article ID 836172, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/836172
Research Article

Physiological Function of Mycobacterial mtFabD, an Essential Malonyl-CoA:AcpM Transacylase of Type 2 Fatty Acid Synthase FASII, in Yeast mct1 Cells

Section of Physiology of Lipid Metabolism, Center for Physiology, Pathophysiology and Immunology, Institute of Physiology, Medical University of Vienna, Schwarzspanierstrasse 17, 1090 Vienna, Austria

Received 16 March 2009; Accepted 31 July 2009

Academic Editor: Eivind Hovig

Copyright © 2009 Aner Gurvitz. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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