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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 875901, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/875901
Research Article

How Fast Is the Sessile Ciona?

1Laboratory of Animal Physiology and Evolution, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, 80121 Napoli, Italy
2Sección Biomatemática, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, Igua 4225, 11400 Montevideo, Uruguay

Received 9 April 2009; Accepted 22 September 2009

Academic Editor: James Thomas

Copyright © 2009 Luisa Berná et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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