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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 408705, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/408705
Research Article

Identifying Functional Mechanisms of Gene and Protein Regulatory Networks in Response to a Broader Range of Environmental Stresses

Laboratory of Systems Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan

Received 11 June 2009; Revised 15 January 2010; Accepted 26 January 2010

Academic Editor: Graziano Pesole

Copyright © 2010 Cheng-Wei Li and Bor-Sen Chen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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