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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 141386, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/141386
Review Article

The Bic-C Family of Developmental Translational Regulators

Department of Biology, McGill University, 3649 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montréal, QC, Canada H3G 0B1

Received 24 January 2012; Accepted 18 February 2012

Academic Editor: Greco Hernández

Copyright © 2012 Chiara Gamberi and Paul Lasko. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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