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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012, Article ID 475731, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/475731
Review Article

Before It Gets Started: Regulating Translation at the 5′ UTR

1Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA
2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA
3Department of Management Science and Statistics, UTSA, San Antonio, TX 78249-0631, USA
4Molecular and Computational Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, USC, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2910, USA
5Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA

Received 2 January 2012; Revised 22 February 2012; Accepted 11 March 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas Preiss

Copyright © 2012 Patricia R. Araujo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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