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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012, Article ID 576540, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/576540
Review Article

The Role of Translation Initiation Regulation in Haematopoiesis

1Department of Pathology, Medical School, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2090, Malta
2Department of Hematopoiesis, Sanquin Research and Landsteiner Laboratory, AMC/UvA, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Received 20 January 2012; Accepted 25 February 2012

Academic Editor: Greco Hernández

Copyright © 2012 Godfrey Grech and Marieke von Lindern. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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