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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2014, Article ID 165897, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/165897
Review Article

MicroRNAs in the Neural Retina

Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, 500 S. Preston Street, Louisville, KY 40292, USA

Received 29 July 2013; Revised 15 January 2014; Accepted 21 January 2014; Published 5 March 2014

Academic Editor: Elena Pasyukova

Copyright © 2014 Kalina Andreeva and Nigel G. F. Cooper. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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