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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2014, Article ID 820248, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/820248
Review Article

MicroRNAs in the DNA Damage/Repair Network and Cancer

Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito 2, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy

Received 6 July 2013; Accepted 10 December 2013; Published 30 January 2014

Academic Editor: John Parkinson

Copyright © 2014 Alessandra Tessitore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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