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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 865065, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/865065
Research Article

Identification and Expression Profiling of the BTB Domain-Containing Protein Gene Family in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, No. 2 Tiansheng Street, Beibei District, Chongqing 400715, China

Received 24 January 2014; Revised 5 April 2014; Accepted 7 April 2014; Published 6 May 2014

Academic Editor: Margarita Hadzopoulou-Cladaras

Copyright © 2014 Daojun Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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