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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2015, Article ID 167578, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/167578
Research Article

DNA-Encoded Chromatin Structural Intron Boundary Signals Identify Conserved Genes with Common Function

1Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
2Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA

Received 1 October 2014; Accepted 15 February 2015

Academic Editor: Soraya E. Gutierrez

Copyright © 2015 Justin A. Fincher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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