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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2015, Article ID 484626, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/484626
Research Article

Heat Shock Protein 70 and 90 Genes in the Harmful Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides: Genomic Structures and Transcriptional Responses to Environmental Stresses

1Department of Life Science, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743, Republic of Korea
2Fishery and Ocean Information Division, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Busan 619-705, Republic of Korea

Received 18 November 2014; Accepted 31 March 2015

Academic Editor: Elena Pasyukova

Copyright © 2015 Ruoyu Guo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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