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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2016, Article ID 1679574, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1679574
Research Article

Identification of Alternative Variants and Insertion of the Novel Polymorphic AluYl17 in TSEN54 Gene during Primate Evolution

1National Primate Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Cheongju 28116, Republic of Korea
2National Primate Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, University of Science & Technology (UST), Cheongju 28116, Republic of Korea

Received 6 September 2016; Accepted 30 October 2016

Academic Editor: Shen Liang Chen

Copyright © 2016 Ja-Rang Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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