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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017, Article ID 1537538, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1537538
Research Article

Antioxidant System Response and cDNA-SCoT Marker Profiling in Phoenix dactylifera L. Plant under Salinity Stress

Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence should be addressed to Salim Khan; ni.oc.oohay@71nahkmilaS

Received 29 November 2016; Revised 23 April 2017; Accepted 2 May 2017; Published 18 June 2017

Academic Editor: Ferenc Olasz

Copyright © 2017 Fahad Al-Qurainy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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