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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017, Article ID 2312318, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2312318
Research Article

Identifying Novel Glioma-Associated Noncoding RNAs by Their Expression Profiles

1Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
2Institute of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
3Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Correspondence should be addressed to Damjan Glavač; is.jl-inu.fm@cavalg.najmad

Received 12 May 2017; Accepted 20 July 2017; Published 12 September 2017

Academic Editor: Massimo Romani

Copyright © 2017 Alenka Matjašič et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) play a significant role in cancer development as regulators of protein-coding genes. Their dysregulation was in some extent already associated with glioma, the most aggressive primary brain tumours in adults. The correct diagnosis and treatment selection due to high tumour heterogeneity might be difficult and inadequate, resulting in poor prognosis. Studies of expression patterns of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) could provide useful insight in glioma molecular development. We used the qPCR approach to screen and investigate the expression of lncRNAs that were previously deregulated in other cancer types. The study showed altered expression levels for numerous lncRNAs across histologically different glioma samples. Validation of few lncRNAs showed association of expression levels with histological subtype and/or malignancy grade. We also observed deregulated and subtype-distinctive expression for four lncRNA-associated miRNAs. Expression of few lncRNAs and miRNA was also associated with patients’ survival, showing potential prognostic value. Several ncRNAs, some already related to glioma and some, to the best of our knowledge, investigated for the first time, might be of greater importance in glioma molecular development and progression. Finding the subtype-specific lncRNA and/or miRNA expression patterns may contribute additional information for a more objective classification.