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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7208318, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7208318
Research Article

An Exploration of Gene-Gene Interactions and Their Effects on Hypertension

1School of Nursing, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
3Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Ying Meng; ude.retsehcor.cmru@gnem_gniy

Received 6 February 2017; Accepted 24 April 2017; Published 31 May 2017

Academic Editor: Margarita Hadzopoulou-Cladaras

Copyright © 2017 Ying Meng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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