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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2018, Article ID 1361402, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1361402
Research Article

Urinary Metabolomic Study of Chlorogenic Acid in a Rat Model of Chronic Sleep Deprivation Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

1Center for Chinese Medicine Therapy and Systems Biology, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
2Central Laboratory, Baoshan District Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Shanghai, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201999, China
3Experiment Center of Teaching & Learning, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
4Department of Physiology, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
5Research Center for Health and Nutrition, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ming-mei Zhou; moc.361@863mmuohz and Xiao-jun Gou; moc.361@5791nujoaixuog

Received 30 August 2017; Revised 24 November 2017; Accepted 14 December 2017; Published 11 February 2018

Academic Editor: Yong Wang

Copyright © 2018 Wei-ni Ma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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