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International Journal of Geophysics
Volume 2010, Article ID 146496, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/146496
Research Article

A Magma Accretion Model for the Formation of Oceanic Lithosphere: Implications for Global Heat Loss

1Coordenadoria de Geofísica, Observatório Nacional—MCT, Rua General José Cristino, CEP 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia do Mucuri, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, CEP 39800-000, Teófilo Otoni, Brazil

Received 28 October 2009; Revised 24 February 2010; Accepted 7 March 2010

Academic Editor: Shuichi Kodaira

Copyright © 2010 Valiya M. Hamza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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