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International Journal of Hepatology
Volume 2012, Article ID 106923, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/106923
Review Article

Fungal Infections: Their Diagnosis and Treatment in Transplant Recipients

Section of Hepatology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

Received 7 February 2012; Accepted 23 April 2012

Academic Editor: Giuliano Ramadori

Copyright © 2012 David H. Van Thiel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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