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International Journal of Hepatology
Volume 2012, Article ID 328372, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/328372
Review Article

The MAPK MEK1/2-ERK1/2 Pathway and Its Implication in Hepatocyte Cell Cycle Control

1Inserm, U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé l’Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, SFR Biosit, 35043 Rennes, France
2IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Villejean, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes, France
3Institut de Recherche en Immunologie et Cancérologie, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7

Received 29 May 2012; Revised 6 September 2012; Accepted 10 September 2012

Academic Editor: Chantal Desdouets

Copyright © 2012 Jean-Philippe Guégan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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