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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2012, Article ID 268013, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/268013
Research Article

State Anxiety Is Associated with Cardiovascular Reactivity in Young, Healthy African Americans

1Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707, USA
2School of Business, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707, USA
3Department of Psychology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707, USA

Received 1 August 2011; Revised 7 October 2011; Accepted 21 November 2011

Academic Editor: Tavis S. Campbell

Copyright © 2012 Mildred A. Pointer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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