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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 474870, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/474870
Review Article

Renin-Angiotensin System and Sympathetic Neurotransmitter Release in the Central Nervous System of Hypertension

1Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research Center, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Osaka 590-0482, Japan
2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama 641-8509, Japan

Received 24 August 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editor: Ovidiu C. Baltatu

Copyright © 2012 Kazushi Tsuda. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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