International Journal of Hypertension

Brain RAS: Hypertension and Beyond


Publishing date
25 Jan 2013
Status
Published
Submission deadline
07 Sep 2012

Lead Editor

1Rue es Planches 5, 2842 Rossemaison, Switzerland

2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328-2018, USA

3Center of Biomedical Engineering, University Camilo Castelo Branco, Rod. Presidente Dutra Km 138, 12247-004 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil

4Department of Molecular and Biochemical Pharmacology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium


Brain RAS: Hypertension and Beyond

Description

Cardiac output and vascular resistance, that control blood pressure (BP), are regulated through neural, humoral, and local tissue factors. The sympathetic and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays major roles. Vasopressin and vasodepressor hormones are also involved.

Angiotensin and its metabolites act as endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and intracrine regulators.

The clinical efficiency of renin/ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers and the presence of their targets in the brain illustrate the interaction with peripheral RAS. The brain RAS regulates blood pressure through sympathetic activation and vasopressin release. Transgenic animal models over- or underexpressing RAS components in a tissue-specific manner illustrate how brain and peripheral RAS interact.

All the constituents of the RAS occur in the brain. In addition, the AT1, AT2, AT4/IRAP, and Mas receptors, aldosterone-synthesizing enzyme are present. Aminopeptidases and other angiotensin-degrading enzymes, for example, ACE2, endopeptidase which form fragments such as Ang III, Ang IV, Ang 2-10, change BP regulation. Ang III in the brain may promote hypertension and Ang IV affects vasopressinase activity. Moreover, the interconnection between neurotransmitters and brain RAS influences behavior and neurological diseases, for example, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. AT1 receptors stimulate DOPA release in the striatum whereas AT2 receptors may decrease dopamine synthesis. Intracerebroventricular infusion of a selective renin inhibitor, aliskiren, reduces salt-induced sympathetic activity and hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive rats and improves spatial memory and reduces depression in aging Alzheimer’s patients.

We invite contributions of original and review articles regarding the interrelationship of brain, hypertension, and behavior in animal models as well as in patients. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Brain RAS and sympathetic activity
  • Brain RAS; angiotensin processing; brain RAS and aldosterone; the prorenin receptor; roles of angiotensin metabolites; inhibitors of brain RAS
  • Brain RAS and Dopamine
  • Brain RAS and inflammation
  • Brain RAS and behavior, obesity, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease, stress, anxiety, mental retardation

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijht/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 157180
  • - Editorial

Brain RAS: Hypertension and Beyond

Marc de Gasparo | Robert C. Speth | ... | Patrick Vanderheyden
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 175428
  • - Research Article

Immunohistochemical Localization of , , and Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

Courtney Premer | Courtney Lamondin | ... | Mark S. Brownfield
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 782861
  • - Research Article

Distinct Molecular Effects of Angiotensin II and Angiotensin III in Rat Astrocytes

Michelle A. Clark | Chinh Nguyen | Hieu Tran
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 156179
  • - Research Article

The Brain-Heart Connection: Frontal Cortex and Left Ventricle Angiotensinase Activities in Control and Captopril-Treated Hypertensive Rats—A Bilateral Study

Ana B. Segarra | Isabel Prieto | ... | Manuel Ramírez-Sánchez
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 941783
  • - Review Article

Elevated Blood Pressure in the Acute Phase of Stroke and the Role of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

Simona Lattanzi | Mauro Silvestrini | Leandro Provinciali
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 513047
  • - Review Article

AT2 Receptor-Interacting Proteins ATIPs in the Brain

Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira | Erwann le Rouzic | ... | Clara Nahmias
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 136028
  • - Review Article

The Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Mitochondrial Function: Influence on Blood Pressure and Baroreflex in Transgenic Rat Strains

Manisha Nautiyal | Amy C. Arnold | ... | Debra I. Diz
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2013
  • - Article ID 521783
  • - Review Article

The Angiotensin-Melatonin Axis

Luciana A. Campos | Jose Cipolla-Neto | ... | Ovidiu C. Baltatu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 739274
  • - Review Article

RAS in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia and Eclampsia

M. Rodriguez | J. Moreno | J. Hasbun
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 351758
  • - Review Article

The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

Marie-Odile Guimond | Nicole Gallo-Payet
International Journal of Hypertension
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate35%
Submission to final decision137 days
Acceptance to publication47 days
CiteScore1.820
Impact Factor1.865
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