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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 148689, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/148689
Review Article

The Interstitial Lymphatic Peritoneal Mesothelium Axis in Portal Hypertensive Ascites: When in Danger, Go Back to the Sea

1Surgery I Department, School of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2Surgery Department, School of Medicine, Autonoma University of Madrid, 28046 Madrid, Spain
3General Surgery Unit, Sudeste Hospital, Arganda del Rey, 28500 Madrid, Spain
4Cellular Biology and Morphological Sciences Department, School of Medicine, Autonoma University of Madrid, 28046 Madrid, Spain
5Cell Engineering Laboratory, La Paz Hospital, Autonoma University of Madrid, 28046 Madrid, Spain
6Neurosciences Unit, Psychobiology Department, School of Psychology, University of Oviedo, 33003 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain

Received 3 March 2010; Revised 10 June 2010; Accepted 26 July 2010

Academic Editor: Wothan de Lima

Copyright © 2010 M. A. Aller et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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