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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 641910, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/641910
Review Article

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: When Natural Friends Turn into Enemies—The Importance of CpG Motifs of Bacterial DNA in Intestinal Homeostasis and Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Regensburg, 93042 Regensburg, Germany

Received 1 April 2010; Accepted 14 July 2010

Academic Editor: Christian Jobin

Copyright © 2010 Florian Obermeier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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