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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 704321, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/704321
Review Article

The Opportunistic Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes: Pathogenicity and Interaction with the Mucosal Immune System

Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstraße 7, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland

Received 14 April 2010; Accepted 1 June 2010

Academic Editor: Dirk Haller

Copyright © 2010 Markus Schuppler and Martin J. Loessner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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