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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 721419, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/721419
Review Article

Inflammatory Regulation of Valvular Remodeling: The Good(?), the Bad, and the Ugly

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, 304 Weill Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Received 3 May 2011; Revised 16 June 2011; Accepted 20 June 2011

Academic Editor: Adrian Chester

Copyright © 2011 Gretchen J. Mahler and Jonathan T. Butcher. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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