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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 985815, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/985815
Review Article

Curbing Inflammation through Endogenous Pathways: Focus on Melanocortin Peptides

1William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK
2The Centre for Experimental Medicine & Rheumatology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine & Dentistry, 2nd Floor, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK

Received 22 February 2013; Revised 11 April 2013; Accepted 14 April 2013

Academic Editor: Christopher D. Buckley

Copyright © 2013 Tazeen J. Ahmed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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