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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 452095, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/452095
Review Article

Curbing Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and Endometriosis: Should Mast Cells Be Targeted?

1Department of Surgery, Wound Healing Initiative, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
2Centre for Hip Health & Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Received 26 January 2015; Accepted 28 September 2015

Academic Editor: Alexander J. Steven

Copyright © 2015 David A. Hart. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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