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International Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 2018, Article ID 9419521, 21 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9419521
Review Article

Crystallography and Its Impact on Carbonic Anhydrase Research

University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Robert McKenna; ude.lfu@annekcmr

Received 2 May 2018; Accepted 16 August 2018; Published 13 September 2018

Academic Editor: Qi-Dong You

Copyright © 2018 Carrie L. Lomelino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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