Table of Contents
International Journal of Medical Genetics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 856313, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/856313
Research Article

Evidence for Central Asian Origin of the p.Val27Ile Variant in the GJB2 Gene

Departamento de Neurociencias, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco 289, Colonia Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México, DF, Mexico

Received 29 August 2014; Accepted 9 November 2014; Published 7 December 2014

Academic Editor: Nejat Akar

Copyright © 2014 Guille García Sánchez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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