Table of Contents
International Journal of Molecular Imaging
Volume 2016, Article ID 7857849, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7857849
Clinical Study

Accuracy of Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy after Liver Transplantation and Liver Resection

1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Goethe University, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany
2Department of Biostatistics, Goethe University, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany
3Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Goethe University, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany

Received 27 May 2016; Accepted 10 July 2016

Academic Editor: Francesca Pons

Copyright © 2016 Manuel Eckenschwiller et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and Aims. Biliary complications are the most frequent complications after common liver surgeries. In this study, accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) and impact of hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated. Methods. Between November 2007 and February 2016, 131 patients underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy after having liver surgery. 39 patients with 42 scans after LTX () or hepatic resection () were evaluated in the study; 27 were male, with mean age 60 years. The subjects underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled Mebrofenin. The results were compared to ERCP as gold standard performed within one month after HBS. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. We compared LTX patients to patients with other liver surgeries. Furthermore the influence of hyperbilirubinemia on HBS scans was evaluated. Results. HBS always provided the correct diagnosis in cases of bile leak in the liver-resected group (14/14). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 76% (19/25) in this group and 54% (7/13) in the LTX group. False negative (FN) diagnoses occurred more often among LTX patients (). Hyperbilirubinemia (>5 mg/dL) significantly influenced the excretion function of the liver, prolonging HBS’s time-activity-curve (). Conclusions. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a reliable tool to detect biliary complications, but reduced accuracy must be considered after LTX.