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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2010, Article ID 124509, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/124509
Review Article

Importance of Lipopolysaccharide and Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans in Brucella-Mammalian Infections

School of Medicine & Dentistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK

Received 13 July 2010; Accepted 4 October 2010

Academic Editor: Charlene Kahler

Copyright © 2010 Andreas F. Haag et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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