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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 896510, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/896510
Research Article

Effect of Oxygen and Redox Potential on Glucose Fermentation in Thermotoga maritima under Controlled Physicochemical Conditions

1UMR D180, IRD, ESIL, Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 925, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France
2Unité Interactions et Modulateurs de Réponses, IFR88, CNRS, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20, France
3Laboratoire d’Ecologie et de Technologie Microbienne, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologies (INSAT), Université 7 Novembre Carthage, 2 Boulevard de la Terre, BP 676, 1080 Tunis, Tunisia

Received 8 October 2010; Revised 6 December 2010; Accepted 22 December 2010

Academic Editor: Alfons J. M. Stams

Copyright © 2010 Raja Lakhal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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